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TEXT OF DRAFT ROADMAP “From Deficit to Surplus: A Realistic and Achievable Roadmap to make MCDs financially self-reliant”

DRAFT

“From Deficit to Surplus: A Realistic and Achievable Roadmap to make MCDs financially self-reliant”

Table of Contents

Our Vision. 2

We believe. 2

What we want to achieve?. 2

  1. 2000 cr/yr for development of Infrastructure Deficit Areas 2
  2. Timely wages and Arrears of Sanitation Workers and other Municipal Employees. 2
  3. Primary Health. 2
  4. To restore and enhance the monthly pension to Rs2,500 for 2.25 lakh needy persons. 2
  5. Primary Education. 2
  6. Issue vending license and identify vending spaces for 5 lakh Street Vendors. 2
  7. World class scavenging and Solid Waste Management 2

Some other key facts. 2

  1. Transparency and accountability: 2
  2. Lack of innovative ideas to improve revenue generation: 2
  3. Property Tax. 2
  4. Toll Tax Collections: 2
  5. Outdoor Advertisement 2
  6. Revenue from Car Parking. 2

How to achieve it?. 2

  1. Property Tax Reforms. 2
  2. Development of Land Bank as an Annual Revenue Generation Resource. 2
  3. Municipal Bonds and Credit Rating. 2
  4. Street Vendors License. 2
  5. Transparent Toll Tax Collections. 2
  6. Outdoor Advertisements. 2
  7. Parking Charges. 2

 

 

 

The Three Municipal Corporations across Delhi are struggling to meet their objectives and have failed to even come close to the promises made to the Delizens.

The common cause put across by the Municipal councillors and the officers of the MCD is the lack of fund and lack of political synergy between, State, Centre & the Municipal Corporations. The said reasoning is nothing but an alibi far from reality and the given excuses are nothing but an ‘eyewash’ to cover for extensive pilferage and plundering of public funds and thereby stifling the revenue potential that the MCD could have earned on its own.

The current leadership is bankrupt with regards to fiscal sapience that is required to bring out the MCD from the current mess. While a local street vendor, a housewife or a businessman knows how to maintain a balance between expenses and income, however, the BJP ruled MCDs have failed to attain this basic understaing.

Few of the major causes which have brought the MCD to disrepute and ridicule of the people of Delhi are listed below:

  1. Extensive pilferage in implementation and collection of the revenue from existing resources;
  2. Lackadaisical planning & management of the funds allotted by centre and state;
  3. Lack of innovation and failure to generate additional revenue potential without creating a burden on people;
  4. Rampant corruption, nepotism and lack of political will to take action;
  5. Lack of vision & political will to implement key guidelines;
  6. Inefficient human resource and infrastructure management;
  7. Complete lack of planning & co-ordination within the MCD as well with other Government bodies;
  8. Failure to engage and connect with employees, citizens for their participation in many key initiatives taken by Municipalities themselves, State & Centre;
  9. Undue delay and reluctance in implementation of the Fourth Finance Commission by Delhi Government;
  10. Projects not moving from drawing boards;

It’s no denying that currently there is a gap in the financial requirements of the Municipal corporations and the same not being filled-in either by the State or the Central Government as both have deeply politicised the municipal organisation by constant rope pulling for their own petty benefits, It’s a reality that presently the municipal corporations of the National Capital are being governed and guided in most inept manner. There is tremendous potential and opportunities available with the corporations provided that vision of performance and transparenct public service replaces the current red-tapism. Also, the majority of the requirements of the corporations can be easily met within, and without being unduly dependent on grants being doled out as alms.

The rightful and just financial commitments that are to be met through pool of Centre and State Government treasury, needs to be collected in time-bound manner and utilized judiciously in planned and focused manner than indulging in often repeated passing the buck game of “MCD has not got funds on time or MCD has not got enough funds”.

Our Vision

We will be focusing on fiscal management of the 3 municipal corporations essentially through two platforms, i.e. Protecting and safeguarding the “Interest of Delizens”, especially those belonging to economically weaker sections and “Make the MCDs financially self-reliant-From Deficit to Surplus”

We believe

“Real, sustainable transformation of the 3 Delhi Municipal Corporation can only be achieved by sound financial management and developing internal capacity & governance through synergy with all stake holders…the most important of which are Delizens themselves!”-And this is achievable in a time frame of two years only.

What we want to achieve?

1.      2000 cr/yr for development of Infrastructure Deficit Areas

Annual funds of Rs2000 crores for development of infrastructure deficit areas of Delhi, particularly the Unauthorised Colonies and the Slums.

2.      Timely wages and Arrears of Sanitation Workers and other Municipal Employees

Sanitation Workers are provided uninterrupted wages and arrears immediately released. Sanitation workers, and other employees of the Municipal Corporations should be paid wages on time. All pending arrears to Sanitation Workers be released. The pending arears to sanitation workers are as follows:

  1. a) North DMC- 550.07 crores
  2. b) South DMC- 547.30 Crores
  3. c) East DMC- 461.82 crores (All Employees)

Total pending arears thus is 1,559.19 crores in all the MCDs.

3.      Primary Health

Public health systems are different from private health providers in that they are supposed to promote health and prevent disease in addition to providing healthcare.

Public health requires a systemic view with appropriate backward and forward linkages at different levels- primary; secondary and tertiary- of healthcare delivery. Role of primary health centres to provide information, screen for risk factors, provide curative services at the primary level and triage patients for appropriate level of healthcare. Moreover, primary health centres should be equipped to expand healthcare delivery during epidemics and other health emergencies.

Instead of concentrating on its core area of Primary Health, the Delhi’s Municipal Corporations (falling under the jurisdiction of North MCD) has six big hospitals under it costing around 652 crores per year (51.3% is salary). MCDs have been resisting transfer of these Hospitals to Delhi Government. Delhi Government can use its funds to further develop these hospitals, which otherwise are in depleted conditions. This amount thus saved by the MCDs can be used to set up a robust first line of defence as primary health centres.

‘Health for All’ will be the mantra for the municipal bodies and guiding principle for all municipal health programmes and would be supported through CSR programmes. All health facilities will be transformed into comprehensive Primary Health Centres adequately equipped to act as first response centre.  Ward Committee would play a fundamental role in monitoring and planning of health services. No user fees would be charged in any health centres. Essential medical supplies will be provided in adequate quantities and at no cost to the patients through better and efficient running of MCD dispensaries

4.      To restore and enhance the monthly pension to Rs2,500 for 2.25 lakh needy persons

To restore and enhance the monthly pension to Rs 2,500 of two lakhs twenty-five thousand needy persons @ 800/ ward by spending Rs 675 crores/ year. Pension given by the councillors to needy persons in their wards (800 Pensions per ward) has been with-held since last 44 months in the East Delhi, 27 Months in North Delhi and 20 months in South Delhi Municipal Corporations.

5.      Primary Education

Following startling features indicate the plight of municipal corporations run primary education in Delhi.

  1. a) Number of students in South DMC have dropped by 56,703 in last 5 years
  2. b) More than 100 schools in South, 262 schools in East and most of the schools in North Delhi Municipal Corporations do not have Fire NOC.
  3. c) 205 schools in South and East Delhi do not have Delhi Jal Board Metered connections.
  4. d) Primary School infrastructure is in shambles. School buildings, Toiles, Desks, school uniforms, textbooks etc are way behind the standards of a National Capital.

Primary Education will be the focus and additional revenue generated will be spent adequately and wisely on it. Improvement of facilities, through enhanced funding in MCD primary schools through a unique Donor Programme- “Shiksha Nayaks”, by involving the citizens in this noble cause. Such programs have been successfully implemented by the municipalities in Karnataka and they would be studied and implemented with required amendments.

The objectives of the Donor programme would be improving the infrastructural facilities and overall development of the primary schools.  A separate civil task force (or society) would be formed to monitor receipt and finance details. Under the Societies Act donors are subject to exemption from Income Tax under Section 80G. Various options can be offered to donors:

  1. i) If the 2nd party (the donor) wishes to avail the benefits of I.T. exemption and use his own contractors for fulfilling the works, then he should remit his funds directly to Society and execute the work. The work would be supervised by the officials and payments would be made to the contractor.
  2. ii) If the Donor desires to contribute funds to a particular work in their choice of school, the estimates will be prepared by the Engineers of MCD and the said work will be carried out by the Society as per Government Rules and necessary payment will be released by the Donor (I.T exemption, the funds flows needs to be confirmed once with the authorities).

iii)                If the Donor is not interested in IT Exemption under 80 G and desires to execute the work by hiring a Contractor as per his selection of school, he can carry out the work by obtaining necessary No Objection Certificate from the Society and necessary supervision will be done by the Engineering Section Heads of MCD.

  1. iv) The Primary School may be named after the donor who donates Rs. 5,00,000 /- for a period of 2 years and if he is interested, the Primary School may be named after the donor who donated Rs.10,00,000 /- for a period of 5 years . The donor would have first right of refusal for continuing their name after the naming period expires, however this would be subject to all conditions of contract being fulfilled.

6.      Issue vending license and identify vending spaces for 5 lakh Street Vendors

Street Vendors (Protection of Livelihood and Regulation of Street Vending) Act, 2014 was legislated by the Union Congress Government. It mandates for identification of proper vending spaces and issuing vending license by the ULBs @ 2.5% of the total urban population. Delhi thus qualifies for around 5lakh vending spaces and licenses.

Following is the number of official vendor licence holders in Delhi:

S. No. Municipal Body Number of vendors having license
SDMC 4412
EDMC 1742
North DMC 7680
NDMC 700 (approx.)

But all the ULBs in Delhi have issued only 14,534 vending licenses. It has resulted in an inspector raj where-in each of these 5 lakh vendors end up paying Rs150 to Rs1000 per day to municipal and police authorities. If Street Vendors Act is implemented and Rs1000/month is charged from each of the vendor, MCDs can collect Rs600 crores per year. Using this money, we can pay the arears of sanitation workers (Rs1559.19 crores) in two and a half years! A win-win for everyone.

7.      World class scavenging and Solid Waste Management

There is a huge shortage of jetting machines, trucks, loaders, bulldozers , suction machines in Municipal Corporations.

As per the ‘Delhi Citizens’ Handbook 2016′ prepared by ‘Centre for Civil Society’, theMunicipal Corporations were unable to utilise funds allocated under the Centre’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) with the NDMC “failing” to spend a single penny out of the Rs 46.28 crore allocated to it, a study report says. According to ‘Delhi Citizens’ Handbook 2016′ prepared by ‘Centre for Civil Society’, North Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) received Rs 46.28 crore under the SBM for 2015-16, but the civic body could not spend a single amount and the entire corpus of these funds is “lying unutilised”. Similarly, South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC) managed to only spend 0.25 per cent out of the total received amount of Rs 31.63 crore. Municipal Corporations were unable to utilise funds allocated under the Centre’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) with the NDMC “failing” to spend a single penny out of the Rs 46.28 crore allocated to it, a study report says. According to ‘Delhi Citizens’ Handbook 2016′ prepared by ‘Centre for Civil Society’, North Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) received Rs 46.28 crore under the SBM for 2015-16, but the civic body could not spend a single amount and the entire corpus of these funds is “lying unutilised”. Similarly, South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC) managed to only spend 0.25 per cent out of the total received amount of Rs 31.63 crore.Municipal Corporations were unable to utilise funds allocated under the Centre’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM).

North DMC (DEMS) Unspent Amount

4267.66 Lakhs 2015-16

4600 Lakhs 2016-17

2745 Lakhs 2017-18

Similarly, South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC) managed to only spend 0.25 per cent out of the total received amount of Rs 31.63 Crore in 2015-16.Municipal Corporations were unable to utilise funds allocated under the Centre’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) with the NDMC “failing” to spend a single penny out of the Rs 46.28 crore allocated to it, a study report says. According to ‘Delhi Citizens’ Handbook 2016′ prepared by ‘Centre for Civil Society’, North Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) received Rs 46.28 crore under the SBM for 2015-16, but the civic body could not spend a single amount and the entire corpus of these funds is “lying unutilised”. Similarly, South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC) managed to only spend 0.25 per cent out of the total received amount of Rs 31.63 crore.

Some other key facts

 

1.      Transparency and accountability:

Two out of the three Delhi’s Municipal Corporations are not able to pay their wages in time. Arears due to Sanitation workers, since they regularised, are pending in all the three Municipal Corporations. Pension given by the councillors to beneficiaries in their respective wards (800 Pensions per ward) has been with-held since last 44 months in the East Delhi, 27 Months in North Delhi and 20 months in South Delhi Municipal Corporations. While corporations in Delhi are in a huge financial distress, but on the other hand, with better transparency and accountability, the Mumbai Municipal Corporation has no dearth of money and has a surplus fixed deposit of Rs51,000 crores (even though such a huge amount lying idle in the banks is also equally undesirable). The reason for this is perhaps the following table as indicated in the Economic Survey 2016-17. Mumbai stands first in the ranking of transparency, accountability and participation. And Delhi is sixth from the bottom. This clearly reflects poor and opaque revenue collection.

In a report in Times of India published on 11th May 2016 it has been  reported that a total of 1,332 cases of corruption were reported in three municipal corporations of Delhi in the last three years, of which 630 have been investigated and mere 24 officials penalised. A total of 1,332 cases of corruption were reported in three municipal corporations of Delhi in the last three years, of which 630 have been investigated and 24 officials penalised, the Rajya Sabha was informed

In the same report a statement made by the Minister of State for Home has been reported as under:

“In the last three years, a total of 1,332 cases have been reported in three Municipal Corporations in Delhi and 630 cases have been investigated,” Minister of State for Home Haribhai Parathibhai Chaudhary said during Question Hour.

The Minister also said that a total of 79 officials were booked by the CBI and Anti-Crime Bureau in 42 cases registered by them in the last three years.

 

2.      Lack of innovative ideas to improve revenue generation:

 

Delhi’s 4th Finance Commission (March 2013) while analysing the finances of Delhi’s Municipal Corporations has observed that:-

“…in case of MCD, the tax collection is around two-third of the total internal revenue indicating that it is totally dependent on taxes and is not mobilising revenue from other sources like user-charges, rentals etc. for increasing the internal revenue further.” It would be interesting to see here the performance of another ULB from Delhi in this regard. The chart/s for New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) under the Union Government points some interesting facts. The NDMC, unlike Delhi’s Municipal Corporations, is self-dependent with 94% of its revenue mobilised from internal sources. Besides, 84% of this revenue is Non-Tax revenue. Around 450 crores are earned annually by the NDMC through rental income.

While 14% of Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) is funded by GNCTD, 2% is stipulated from property development. Above Table also clearly indicates that DMRC had annual earnings up-to Rs130.94 crores from Leasing out Property. Despite having huge land banks available, Delhi’s Municipal Corporations have failed to realise this potential. Even for the Hong Kong Metro’s annual revenue, 35-40% is contributed by property rentals.

 

3.      Property Tax

Following table depicts the property tax collection details from Delhi’s Municipal Corporations. Property Tax rates have remained unchanged since last many years. It is mentioned in the 4th Finance Commission (2013) Report that only one-third of eligible properties are in tax net. Thus, Rs1,600 crores of Property Tax are just 33% of the Property Tax potential. If we can take it to 80% using GIS and other modern technology, it can be increased by Rs2,278 crores to Rs3,878 crores per year.

4.      Toll Tax Collections:

Toll Tax collections also have been fraught with corruption and opacity. The South MCD had asked in 2014, Sriram Institute for Industrial Research (SIIR) to conduct a survey of number of vehicles entering Delhi and the amount of Toll Tax which can be collected. SIIR suggested that the yearly estimated revenue collection should be Rs1922 crores. The table of Toll Tax collection depicts only 42% of the potential with a shortfall of 1135.12 crores last FY alone. Even if we set aside 3% collection charges and 15% contractor’s profit, the annual collection should be Rs1574 crores. This is a shortfall of 50%!

 

5.      Outdoor Advertisement

This is another area, where there is an enormous scope. Last few years, collection figures and variation also indicates grave irregularities.

 

6.      Revenue from Car Parking

There are many technological innovations for enhancing revenue from Car Parking. Following is the revenue collected and the variations as seen in outdoor advertising revenue collection depicts a sorry state.

 

 

How to achieve it?

 

1.      Property Tax Reforms

Following table depicts the property tax collection details from Delhi’s Municipal Corporations. Property Tax rates have remained unchanged since last many years. It is mentioned in the 4th Finance Commission (2013) Report that only one-third of eligible properties are in tax net. Thus, Rs1,600 crores of Property Tax are just 33% of the Property Tax potential.

If we can take it to 80% using GIS and other modern technology, it can be increased by Rs2,278 crores to Rs3,878 crores per year.

2.      Development of Land Bank as an Annual Revenue Generation Resource

Huge land bank is available with Delhi’s Municipal Corporations. As indicated above, New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) draws around 450 crores annually from rental income. Even the DMRC uses land as a resource, both as capital and revenue. But the Delhi’s Municipal Corporations hardly uses its vast land banks to generate revenue.

3.      Municipal Bonds and Credit Rating

To begin with, soon after bringing in transparency and accountability, steps should be undertaken to get Credit rating from reputed credit rating agency.

Municipal City Development Bonds should be introduced in the open market after taking all corrective steps and approvals, so that the dependency on state and centre financing can be avoided. Similar approach had been taken Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation successfully. These initiatives have been successfully adopted in developed nation and Municipal corporations in Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhara Pradesh had benefited from them.

The tax-free City Development Bond issued by the Municipal Corporation of Hyderabad to the tune of Rs.82.5 Crores during March 2002  is one such example. The bond issue was assigned CRISIL rating AA+(SO) and ICRA rating LAA+(SO).  The bond proceeds are dedicated to the financing of development projects including traffic and transportation projects to decongest the city—road widening, junction improvement, development of parallel roads, slip roads and link roads, signalisation of intersection etc. storm-water drainage, sewerage and solid waste management, modern lighting and slum up gradation, etc.  Hyderabad City Development Bond have been evaluated as the best-rated municipal bond in the country. 

The Credit rating would also help the municipal corporation to attract FDI in their plans and funding through national & international financial institutions

 

4.      Street Vendors License

Street Vendors (Protection of Livelihood and Regulation of Street Vending) Act, 2014 was legislated by the Union Congress Government. It mandates for identification of proper vending spaces and issuing vending license by the ULBs @ 2.5% of the total urban population. Delhi thus qualifies for around 5lakh vending spaces and licenses. We can also create special zones for Night markets/ food parks or entertainment zones and creating revenues through same.

But all the ULBs in Delhi have issued only 14,534 vending licenses. It has resulted in an inspector raj where-in each of these 5 lakh vendors end up paying Rs150 to Rs1000 per day to municipal and police authorities. If Street Vendors Act is implemented and Rs1000/month is charged from each of the vendor, MCDs can collect Rs600 crores per year. Using this money, we can pay the arears of sanitation workers (Rs1559.19 crores) in two and a half years! A win-win for everyone.

5.      Transparent Toll Tax Collections

Toll Tax collections also have been fraught with corruption and opacity. The South MCD had asked in 2014, Sriram Institute for Industrial Research (SIIR) to conduct a survey of number of vehicles entering Delhi and the amount of Toll Tax which can be collected. SIIR suggested that the yearly estimated revenue collection should be Rs1922 crores. The table of Toll Tax collection depicts only 42% of the potential with a shortfall of 1135.12 crores last FY alone. Even if we set aside 3% collection charges and 15% contractor’s profit, the annual collection should be Rs1574 crores. This is a shortfall of 50%!

6.      Outdoor Advertisements

The current status is pathetic and the corporations have let the outdoor advertising opportunity pass on either to Outdoor mafia or Cartels or have distributed it like sweets to their near and dear ones. They have tied the opportunity down with heavy chains of legal entanglement through various litigations and court stays. The spirit with which they should have nurtured this opportunity is missing.

  • The biggest example of mishandling and mis-governance can’t be more evident than the way the Municipal Corporations have handled the Outdoor Policy of Delhi, which was approved by the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India and Bhure Lal Committee after extensive efforts been put into it, to ensure planned, monitored and controlled growth of Outdoor advertisement in manner that its sole purpose was to make Delhi more habitable, more beautiful and well landscaped, safe, illuminated and as means to provide public facilities to Delizens without any burden on corporations, state’s or centre’s coffers. This becomes even more critical in view of the fact that full bench of the Hon’ble Supreme Court in 2007 overturned its own full bench of judgement of 1997 in which it had banned Outdoor Advertisement in Delhi & permitted it as the new one was Policy based & amenity oriented. But after getting Hon’ble Supreme Court’s nod for the new Outdoor Advertisement Policy, the Corporation never made any attempt to take advantage of it and earn more revenue or to beautify Delhi.
  • Crores and Crores of revenue is being lost month on month, due to failure of the corporations to get their act together, to the benefit of corrupt officials, outdoor advertisers and corporation governing bodies.
  • The sole purpose of the Outdoor policy not getting ratified is that the existing corporations want to benefit unduly in illegal manner to fill in their personal pockets, through corruption and nepotism. They award the outdoor advertising projects without legal and commercial scrutiny and then let corporations entangled in litigations filed by the outdoor advertisers. They are hand in gloves in this with outdoor mafia.
  • There is no mechanism set by the existing corporations to Audit, Monitor and Check the extent of Outdoor revenue being created by other private or public bodies, who are supposed to pay or share the outdoor revenue generated by them. For example auditing of the T3 International Airport, Delhi Metro Rail Corporation, Indian Railway, DND Expressway etc. had never been done in terms of their total revenue earned & the revenue entitlement of the MCD & also the area of actual display Vs the area awarded by the Municipal bodies.
  • There were additional means of revenue generations through new innovative mediums (LED screens in pedestrian areas or in markets, Outdoor Digital screens providing live information, Distress Women Booths, Night Shelters etc.) and the way to apply the fee, which was explained within the Outdoor Policy, has been completely ignored, to ensure that the existing system does not get reformed.
  • The firmness that is required to collect outstanding dues is missing, except for hiding behind the legal framework. No punitive action is taken on time and same outdoor advertisers who have been bleeding corporations are awarded media in same company name or a new name with same ownership, without checking the credentials.

o   The glaring examples of same can be witnessed on BRT Corridor, where illegal media has been created on cycle shelters, on so-called Info-panels, Toilet blocks etc.

o   There has been no tender on DND flyover for last 1.5 years and yet the display of illegal outdoor media can be witnessed over it.

o   On Nizamuddin Bridge the Unipoles have been awarded by UP Irrigation at the rate of Rs5000/ Unipole without calling any tender, which has led to mushrooming of media on it, making it dangerous for commuters, at the same time MCD had been losing in terms of revenue sharing.

o   MCD decided to abolish a major revenue earning source (Wall Wraps) already identified in the Outdoor Advertising Policy because it failed to control and monitor their implementation.

7.      Parking Charges

Cartelization and political influence of the existing governing bodies of the corporations have encouraged these operators to flout every norm, be it of providing safe parking space or charge authorised parking charges or overcrowd parking by exceeding the number of vehicles permitted to be parked in allotted parking space.

The parking charges and other mandatory information that should be displayed in allotted parking space is seldom done. The parking coupons are fraudulently printed without any numbers, no revenues are shared with corporation and no taxes paid on this excessive illegal parking charges collected. This is being done in complete knowledge and with blessings of existing corporation governing bodies.

The proper demarcation is never undertaken and parking operator encroach on public space much beyond the allotted space, sometime to the extent of 3 to 4 times of the allotted space. Thus, robbing the corporations at one hand of the revenue as well as causing inconvenience to the public.

Many of the parking spaces are further sublet or sub-contracted to people who hire petty criminals, untrained attendants etc. who run their tyranny in the neighbourhood. They engage in overcharging, harassing women, sheltering illegal occupants carrying unlawful activities and creating nuisance. Any resistance by parking users and general public to their harassment by this parking mafia results in physical fights and verbal abuses.

Even some of the basic rules and equipment’s operational in New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) area as well as in Private parking spaces in Malls are completely missing. For example the practise of issuance of parking coupons through hand held parking devices which record the time and duration of the parking and collect the correct parking fee and systems like automatic parking coupons issued by self-operated, non-manned coupon dispensing machines used in malls. If such initiatives and operations can be successful in one part of Delhi, there is no excuse for not allowing it in other parts and are ignored through lame excuses.

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1 reply »

  1. Sir, this is a very commendable and interesting roadmap and I appreciate your ideas. However, I feel that this dream of yours would only be possible if there is a majority of congress in MCD elections. And at the same time it is also very important that those elected members should be well educated. For this measure, it is important that the custom and legacy of giving tickets to the sitting counselors only should be stopped. Rather, mcd election tickets should be given to people on their eductaion merit.

    I have no self interest in this and neither do I want to apply for any tickets for the election.

    Amar Nath Babbar
    Age: 63 yrs
    Selfless congress worker continuousally from last 43 yrs.
    Ex-President Block youth congress (1983-1991)
    Ex-Block President 1997
    Kishan Ganj Ward Delhi

    Like

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